WAR IN THE AIR : Updates 2010

Updates from: 20142013201220112010200920082007

31 December 2012

The Curtiss XP-14 was to have been a fighter based around the Curtiss H-1640 Chieftain 12-cylinder air cooled double-row inline engine.

The Curtiss XP-17 was the designation given to the first P-1 when it was used to test a Curtiss Wright Tornado engine.

The Curtiss XP-18 was the designation given to a biplane fighter that was to have been powered by the Wright V-1560-1 twelve-cylinder air-cooled engine.

The Curtiss XP-19 was to have been a low-wing monoplane powered by the Wright V-1560-1 twelve-cylinder air cooled engine.

20 December 2012

The Curtiss P-6 Hawk was the most advanced version of the Hawk biplane fighter to serve with the USAAF, and differed from the earlier P-1 by using a Curtiss V-1570 Conqueror engine.

The Curtiss XP-11 was the designation given to three Hawk biplanes that were to have been powered by the Curtiss Chieftain engine, but the failure of that engine meant that none were completed as P-11s.

17 December 2012

The Curtiss P-2 Hawk was the designation given to five P-1s that were completed with the Curtiss V-1400 engine.

The Curtiss P-3 Hawk was a version of the Hawk fighter powered by the Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine.

The Curtiss P-5 Superhawk was a version of the P-1 Hawk fitted with turbo-supercharged engines.

14 December 2012

The Curtiss PW-8 was the first in a long series of Curtiss biplane fighters to be produced for the US Army and Navy between the two World Wars.

The Curtiss P-1 Hawk was the first in a family of taper-winged biplane fighters that served with the USAAC, the US Navy and that was exported in significant numbers, remaining in service for over a decade.

12 December 2012

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.406H/ D-3800 was a version of the M.S.406 single seat fighter that was built under licence in Switzerland.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.412/ D.3801 was an improved version of the M.S.406 produced in Switzerland after the fall of France.

11 December 2012

The Loening OA-2 amphibian was a version of the OA-1 that was powered by a Wright V-1460-1 Tornado engine.

The Loening XO-10 was the designation given to the XOA-1A prototype when it was delivered to the US Army.

The Focke-Wulf Ta 254 was a design for an improved version of the Ta 154 twin-engined fighter, with bigger wings to improve its service ceiling.

10 December 2012

The Loening O2L was the prototype of an improved version of the Loening OL amphibian biplane.

The Loening XHL-1 was an air ambulance based on the OL-8 observation amphibian.

The Loening OA-1 was an unusual two-man amphibian aircraft that served with the USAAC in the late 1920s.

7 December 2012

The Loening PA-1 was the last fighter to be produced by the Loening company, and was an attempt to produce a successful biplane fighter after the failure of the Loening PW-2 monoplane.

The Loening OL was an unusual amphibian aircraft that used a single main float carried under the fuselage instead of the more standard flying boat hull.

5 December 2012

The Loening M-8 was a monoplane fighter that was ordered into production in large numbers during the First World War, but that was eventually produced in significantly smaller numbers for the US Navy.

The Loening PW-2 was a single seat monoplane fighter that was developed from the earlier M-8, and that was tested by the US Army but not accepted for production.

30 November 2012

The US Air Force and its predecessors have used a series of designation systems to identify their aircraft, starting by using the manufacturer's own codes then adopting a system of type numbers and two letter codes in 1919-20. This was replaced by the more familiar basic mission system in 1924, with single letters for most aircraft types. This remained in use (with variants) until 1962, when it became the basis of the current Tri-service aircraft designation system.

The short-lived 1920-24 USAAS aircraft designation system used one or two letter type designations, originally matched to a Type Number.

The XS designation was used from 1946 to 1948 for experimental supersonic aircraft. In 1948 the letter changed to X for special test, and the existing XS craft became X craft.

29 November 2012

On day two we add Helicopters, Observation and Liaison aircraft, Reconnaissance Aircraft, Trainers and Utility Aircraft.

28 November 2012

Today we start a series of articles on the aircraft designations of the USAAC, USAAF and USAF by looking at Fighter Designations, Bomber Designations, Glider Designations, Cargo Aircraft Designations and Attack Aircraft Designations.

27 November 2012

The 401st Bombardment Group was a B-17 Flying Fortress group that fought with the Eighth Air Force from November 1943 until the end of the war in Europe.

The 452nd Bombardment Group was a B-17 group that fought with the Eighth Air Force from February 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

26 November 2012

The Albatros W.4 was a floatplane fighter based on the Albatros D.I and designed to intercept British flying boats and sea planes that were attacking German air stations on the North Sea coast.

The Albatros W.5 was an improved version of the Albatros W.3 torpedo bomber, but only five were built and the type wasn't accepted by the German navy.

The Albatros W.8 was a patrol floatplane that was designed in 1918 and of which two or possibly three were produced.

23 November 2012

The Albatros W.1/ B.II-W was a floatplane version of the Albatros B.II, the most important of the company's unarmed two-man scouts.

The Albatros W.2 was a floatplane version of the Albatros C.III, the most numerous entry in Albatros' series of armed two-seater scouts, but only a single prototype was built

The Albatros W.3 was a prototype for the Albatros W.5 torpedo bomber, and was largely based on the Albatros G.II bomber.

22 November 2012

The 384th Bombardment Group was a B-17 Flying Fortress group that fought with the Eighth Air Force from June 1943 until the end of the war in Europe.

The 390th Bombardment Group was a B-17 Flying Fortress group that entered service just in time to take part in the raid on Regensburg on 17 August 1943 and that served with the Eighth Air Force for the rest of the Second World War

20 November 2012

The Albatros J.I was a ground attack aircraft somewhat inspired by the A.E.G. J.I but using the wings from the Albatros C.XII and constructed using the typical Albatros methods.

The Albatros J.II was an improved version of the Albatros J.I ground attack aircraft.

15 November 2012

The Albatros C.XIII was a close support aircraft developed from the D.Va fighter. It was basically a two-seat version of that aircraft, but with a 3ft wider wing span and a slight increase in length.

The Albatros C.XIV was smaller than previous Albatros two-seat scouts and became the prototype for the Albatros C.XV, which was ordered into full scale production.

The Albatros C.XV was the last in the series of Albatros two-seat scouts, but although it entered production it arrived too late to see active service.

13 November 2012

The 2nd Bombardment Group was a B-17 bomber group that operated with the Twelfth and Fifteenth Air Force, taking part in the invasion of Sicily, the campaign in Italy and the strategic bombing campaign across Europe.

The 42nd Bombardment Group was a B-25 Mitchell group of the Thirteenth Air Force that operated in the Solomons, New Guinea, Borneo, the Philippines, off the coast of China and over French Indochina.

9 November 2012

The Albatros C.IX was a design for a close support aircraft of which only three were built.

The Albatros C.X was the last in the series of two-seat Albatros scouts to use the basic configuration inherited from the unarmed B-class scouts, but had a more powerful engine and was a significantly larger aircraft than earlier Albatros C-class scouts.

The Albatros C.XII saw the first major change in the configuration of the Albatros two-seater scouts and combined features from the previous C.XII and their later D-class single seat fighters, in particular the D.V.

5 November 2012

The 20th Bombardment Wing was a B-24 Liberator Wing of the Eighth Air Force which took part in the strategic bombing campaign from December 1943 until April 1945.

The 93rd Bombardment Wing was a heavy bomber wing within the Eighth Unit that entered combat just before D-Day and supported the Allied invasion before taking part in the strategic bombing campaign for the rest of the war.

2 November 2012

The Albatros C.VII was similar to the C.V, but was powered by a Benz engine that was produced in much larger numbers than the interim Mercedes engine used on the C.V.

The Albatros C.VIII N was a night bomber developed in 1917 but that never entered service.

31 October 2012

The Albatros C.V was powered by a 220hp Mercedes D.IV engine and because of the limited production of the engine only appeared in small numbers.

The Albatros C.VI was similar to the C.III and the contemporary C.V, but was powered by the 180hp Argus As.III engine.

30 October 2012

The 92nd Bombardment Wing went through two incarnations during the Second World War, both as heavy bomber wings of the Eighth Air Force.

The 94th Bombardment Wing was a B-17 wing within the Eighth Air Force and took part in the strategic bombing campaign in Europe from December 1943 until April 1945.

24 October 2012

The 40th Bombardment Wing formed part of the 1st Air Division of the Eighth Air Force and took part in the strategic bombing campaign over Europe from September 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

The 41st Bombardment Wing was a heavy bomber wing within the Eighth Air Force, and operated three B-17 groups as part of the strategic bombing force from September 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

18 October 2012

The 100th Bombardment Group was a B-17 group that took part in the Eighth Air Force's strategic bombing campaign, supporting the armies on the continent after D-Day and was awarded the Croix de Guerre with Palms.

The 447th Bombardment Group was a B-17 group of the Eighth Air Force that took part in the campaign to support the D-Day landings before joining the full strategic bombing campaign.

17 October 2012

The 95th Bombardment Group was a B-17 group that took part in the Eighth Air Force's strategic bombing campaign over Europe as well as supporting the Allied armies fighting in Europe after D-Day.

The 96th Bombardment Group was a B-17 group that took part in the Eighth Air Force's strategic bombing campaign over Europe and also supported the Allied armies fighting on the continent after D-Day.

12 October 2012

The Mitsubishi Experimental 7-Shi Carrier Attack Aircraft was an unsuccessful aircraft designed in an attempt to replace the Type 89 Carrier Attack Aircraft (B2M).

The Mitsubishi Experimental 9-Shi Carrier Attack Aircraft (B4M1) was a unsuccessful design for a carrier based torpedo and standard bomber that was difficult to control and that didn't enter service. 

11 October 2012

The Albatros C.III was the most numerous of the Albatros two-seater scouts and after a useful front line career went on to serve in even larger numbers as a trainer.

The Albatros C.IV was an experimental aircraft produced to test a new wing and a revised arrangement of the aircrew.

10 October 2012

The 385th Bombardment Group was a B-17 group of the Eighth Air Force and took part in the strategic bombing campaign over Europe.

The 388th Bombardment Group was a B-17 unit that took part in the strategic bombing campaign over Europe, as well as flying a number of tactical missions to support the Allied armies fighting in Europe after D-Day.

4 October 2012

The 2nd Bombardment Wing was a heavy bombardment unit of the Eighth Air Force, and its B-24 Liberators took part in the strategic bombing campaign in Europe, supported the fighting after D-Day and were briefly detached to the Mediterranean.

The 4th Bombardment Wing was a B-17 wing within the Eighth Air Force, and controlled a third of the bomber force until the formation of Bombardment Divisions. It took part in the strategic bombing campaign and also performed tactical bombing missions in support of the D-Day landings and the campaign that followed.

3 October 2012

The Albatros C.I was the first in a series of armed Albatros scout aircraft that were a mainstay of the German air force from 1915 until the end of 1917.

The Albatros C.II Gitterschwanz (lattice tail) was an experimental pusher aircraft built with wings and undercarriage of the Albatros C.I.

1 October 2012

The 94th Bombardment Group was a B-17 unit that took part in the US Strategic campaign over Germany from 1943 to the end of the war in Europe as well as directly supporting the D-Day landings and the land campaign in Europe.

The 381st Bombardment Group was a B-17 group in the Eighth Air Force and took part in the daylight strategic bombing campaign over Europe.

28 September 2012

The Mitsubishi Army Type Ki 1 Trainer was a licence-built version of the Hanriot HD-14 that served as the main basic trainer in the Japanese Army from the mid-1920s until the mid-1930s.

The Mitsubishi Army Type Ko 1 Trainer was a licence-built version of the Nieuport 81-E2, one of the standard training aircraft in the early expansion of Japanese Army aviation.

27 September 2012

No.453 Squadron, RAAF, went through two incarnations during the Second World War, first as a short-lived fighter squadron swept up in the Japanese invasions of Malaya, Sumatra and Java, and second as a fighter squadron based in Britain.

No.454 Squadron, RAAF, was a medium bomber squadron that flew maritime patrols in the Eastern Mediterranean in 1943-44 before joining the Desert Air Force in Italy where it acted as a ground attack unit for the rest of the war.

25 September 2012

The Mitsubishi Hayabusa-type Fighter (1MF2) was designed in response to a Japanese Army fighter specification of 1927 but suffered an accident during testing and never entered production.

The Mitsubishi Experimental Washi-type Light Bomber (2MB2) was an unsuccessful entry into a 1925 Japanese army contest for a light bomber.

24 September 2012

The 351st Bombardment Group was part of the second wave of B-17 groups to join the Eighth Air Force, and took part in the daylight strategic bombing campaign over Germany.

The 379th Bombardment Group was part of the second wave of B-17 Groups to join the Eighth Air Force and took part in the daylight strategic bombing campaign over Germany.

19 September 2012

The Aichi Experimental Three-seat Reconnaissance Seaplane (HD-28) was the third of three Heinkel designs imported into Japan in 1926, and was tested for use as a long range reconnaissance aircraft.

The Aichi Experimental Type 15-Ko Reconnaissance Seaplane (Mi-go) was designed to replace the Type Hansa Reconnaisance Seaplane but wasn't a success and didn't enter production.

18 September 2012

The 305th Bombardment Group was a B-17 Flying Fortress group of the Eighth Air Force and took part in the daylight strategic bombing campaign over Europe.

The 306th Bombardment Group was an early B-17 group within the Eighth Air Force and took part in the daylight strategic bombing offensive from its early stages in 1942 until the end of the war in Europe.

13 September 2012

The 301st Bombardment Group was a B-17 group that entered combat with the Eighth Air Force in Britain but was soon moved to the Mediterreanean, where it operated from North Africa and then Italy.

The 303rd Bombardment Group was a B-17 Flying Fortress group that took part in the Eighth Air Force's strategic bombing campaign from 1942 until the end of the war in Europe.

12 September 2012

The 92nd Bombardment Group was a B-17 Flying Fortress group that formed part of the US Eighth Air Force and took part in the strategic bombing campaign as well as supporting the D-Day invasions, Operation Market Garden, the crossing of the Rhine and taking part in the Battle of the Bulge.

The 97th Bombardment Group took part in the first Eighth Air Force heavy bomber mission of the Second World War, but soon afterwards was transfered to the Mediterranean, where it spent the rest of the war, ending up in Italy

10 September 2012

The Mitsubishi Navy Type 10 Carrier Torpedo Aircraft (1MT1N) was the only triplane to enter military service in Japan, and was produced in small numbers before being replaced by the Mitsubishi Type 13 Carrier Attack Aircraft.

The Mitsubishi Navy Type 10 Carrier Reconnaissance Aircraft (2MR1-2MR4, 2MRT1-2MRT3A) was a successful reconnaissance aircraft designed by Herbert Smith that had a second career as in intermediate trainer.

6 September 2012

The 1st Bombardment Wing formed part of the US Eighth Air Force's strategic bomber force and took part in the daylight bombing campaign over Germany and occupied Europe from 1942 until the end of the Second World War.

The 91st Bombardment Group was a heavy bomber group equipped with the B-17 and that formed part of the Eighth Air Force's strategic bomber force from November 1942 until the end of the Second War World.

4 September 2012

The Mitsubishi Navy Type 10 Carrier Fighter (1MF1 to 1MF5) was the first purpose-built carrier fighter in the world and was designed for Mitsubishi by a British team led by Herbert Smith, previously a senior engineer at Sopwith.

The Mitsubishi Experimental Taka-type Carrier Fighter (1MF9) was the first carrier fighter to be designed by a Japanese engineer, but failed to gain a production order.

31 August 2012

The Aichi AB-2 Experimental Catapult-Launched Reconnaissance Seaplane was the first aircraft of its type to have been designed in Japan without any foreign assistance, but the aircraft wasn't a success and only two prototypes were built.

The Aichi AB-3 Experimental Single-Seat Reconnaissance Seaplane was designed for use on a Chinese light cruiser, but despite being a successful design wasn't accepted by the Chinese.

29 August 2012

No.33 Squadron (RAAF) was a transport squadron that served in the south-west Pacific from 1942 until the end of the Second World War.

No.87 Squadron, RAAF, was a photographic reconnaissance squadron that operated over the Dutch East Indies, Timor, Java, Borneo and even the Philippines.

No.94 Squadron, RAAF, was a Mosquito fighter-bomber squadron formed in Australian in May 1945 but that never saw action.

24 August 2012

The Mitsubishi Army Type 87 Light Bomber (2MB1) was a version of the Navy Type 13 Carrier Attack Aircraft that saw service with the Japanese army early in the conflict in Manchuria.

The Mitsubishi Army Type 92 Reconnaissance Aircraft (2MR8) was a parasol wing aircraft that became the first Japanese military aircraft to use an engine entirely designed and built in Japan.

23 August 2012

No.4 Squadron, RAAF, was an army cooperation squadron that used Commonwealth Wirraway and Boomerang aircraft in support of the troops fighting on New Guinea and Borneo.

No.5 Squadron, RAAF, was an army cooperation squadron that served on Bougainville, New Britain and New Guinea from late in 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

No.24 (City of Adelaide) Squadron, RAAF, took part in the defence of Rabaul in 1941-42, where it suffered heavy losses of aircraft. After escaping to Australia the reinforced squadron took part in the fighting on New Guinea. It was then reformed as a heavy bomber squadron in Australia and taking part in the campaigns on New Guinea, in the Dutch East Indies and on Borneo.

17 August 2012

No.450 Squadron, RAAF, was a fighter squadron during the fighting in Syria in 1941 and in North Africa before becoming a fighter-bomber squadron for the campaigns in Sicily and Italy.

No.451 Squadron, RAAF, was a fighter squadron that provided air cover over Syria, Cyprus and the Nile Delta in 1942-43, and took part in the invasion of Southern France before moving to the UK where it spent 1945 flying a mix of bomber-escort and fighter-bomber missions.

No.452 Squadron, RAAF, was formed in the United Kingdom where it served as a fighter squadron during 1941 and the first part of 1942. It then moved to Australia to face the Japanese, before taking part in the re-conquest of the Dutch East Indies and Borneo.

14 August 2012

No.1 Squadron (RAAF) first saw action during the Second World War as a Lockheed Hudson squadron that was destroyed during the fighting in Malaya, Sumatra and Java. It was then reformed in Australia, and attacked Japanese targets first from Northern Austrian and then from Borneo.

No.2 Squadron (RAAF) fought against the Japanese from 1941 until the end of the war, taking part in the desperate fighting on Timor in late 1941 and early 1942. It then took part in the defence of northern Australia, before going onto the offensive and carrying out a mix of reconnaissance missions and attack missions across the Dutch East Indies

No.3 Squadron (RAAF) was originally a reconnaissance unit, but in 1941 it became a fighter squadron and served in that role in North Africa, Sicily and Italy, ending the war as a ground attack unit.

10 August 2012

The Mitsubishi Ki-20 Army Type 92 Heavy Bomber was based on the Junkers G 38 passenger aircraft, and was an unsuccessful design that never saw combat.

The Mitsubishi Ki-39 was a design for a twin-engined heavy fighter.

9 August 2012

No.9 Squadron (RAAF) was responsible for the amphibious aircraft carried on the cruisers of the Royal Australian Navy. It was formed in January 1939 and was equipped with the Walrus.

No.10 Squadron, RAAF, flew with RAF Coastal Command for the entire duration of the Second World War, sinking six U-boats during that period.

No.15 Squadron, RAAF, was a Beaufort squadron that served as an anti-submarine and convoy escort unit from its formation in 1944 as well as sending a detachment to support the fighting on New Guinea.

6 August 2012

The Aichi E3A1 Navy Type 90-1 Reconnaissance Seaplane (HD 56) was a Heinkel-designed single engined ship-borne reconnaissance aircraft that was produced in small numbers in Japan by Aichi.

The Aichi Experimental Type-H Carrier Fighter (HD-23) was the first single-seat fighter designed by Heinkel, and was a generally unsuccessful design that failed to win a production contract in Japan.

1 August 2012

The Aichi Navy Type 2 Two-seat Reconnaissance Seaplane (HD-25) was an advanced biplane designed by Heinkel and produced by Aichi for the Japanese Navy.

The Aichi Navy Type 2 Single-seat Reconnaissance Seaplane (HD-26) was a Heinkel design imported into Japan by Aichi for use as a ship-borne reconnaissance aircraft, but that didn’t enter service.

26 July 2012

The Albatros G.I was an unsuccessful four-engined bomber, developed during 1915-1916.

The Albatros G.II was a twin engined bomber that served as the prototype for the similar Albatros G.III, which was produced in small numbers.

The Albatros G.III was a two engined bomber that was produced in small numbers starting late in 1916.

23 July 2012

The Albatros Dr.I was one of a large number of triplane fighters designed in Germany during 1917, but didn't enter production.

The Albatros Dr.II was the second triplane design produced by Albatros, and like the Dr.I didn't enter production.

20 July 2012

The Mitsubishi Ki-1 Army Type 93 Heavy Bomber was an unsuccessful attempt to produce a heavy bomber based on the Junkers K 37, and was an unpopular aircraft in service.

The Mitsubishi Ki-2 was the most successful of a series of early Mitsubishi aircraft based on Junkers originals and was a light bomber based on the Junkers K 37.

19 July 2012

No.100 Squadron, RAAF, was the first Australian squadron to be equipped with Australian built Beaufort torpedo bombers, and fought in the defence of Australia and during the Allied campaigns on New Guinea.

No.102 Squadron, RAAF, was formed as a heavy bomber squadron but the war ended before it entered combat, and it saw limited use as a transport unit.

No.107 Squadron, RAAF, was an anti-submarine warfare squadron that used the Vought-Sikorsky Kingfisher to fly anti-submarine patrols off the east coast of Australia.

17 July 2012

The Morane-Saulnier Mörkö was the designation given to M.S.406s and M.S.410s in Finnish service after they had been given the Klimov M-105P engine.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.316 was the designation given to a single M.S.315 basic trainer that was powered by a Regnier inverted V engine.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.317 was a post Second World War designation given to forty M.S.315 primary trainers that were given new engines in the 1960s.

13 July 2012

The Albatros D.XI was the first Albatros fighter to be powered by a rotary engine, but like the other Albatros fighter designs of 1918 didn't enter production.

The Albatros D.XII was one of a series of unsuccessful Albatros fighter designs produced during 1918.

11 July 2012

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.300 was the first in a series of prototypes that led to the successful M.S.316 primary trainer.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.301 was the second in the series of prototypes that led to the successful M.S.315 trainer.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.302 was an intermediate step between the M.S.300 of 1930 and the M.S.315 of 1932.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.315 was a parasol wing two-seat primary trainer that was produced in significant numbers and served with the Armée de l'Air and the Aéronavale.

5 July 2012

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.140S was a biplane air ambulance designed to carry a single stretcher patient.

The Morane-Saulnier MS.141S was an improved version of the MS.140S air ambulance, with a more powerful engine.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.152 was a two-seat fighter reconnaissance aircraft produced in small numbers in the late 1920s.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.341/3 was the only entry in the M.S.340 to M.S.345 series of aircraft to see military service, and was produced in small numbers for the Armée de l'Air.

3 July 2012

The Albatros D.VII was an experimental single seat fighter produced during 1917.

The Albatros D.IX was an attempt to produce a fighter that was easier to produce than earlier models, but its performance was poor and only one was built.

The Albatros D.X was developed for the second D type Competition, of June 1918, but wasn't accepted for production.

28 June 2012

The Albatros B.I was a large three-bay biplane designed before the First World War and that was taken into German service after the outbreak of war.

The Albatros B.II was a wartime development of the Albatros B.I and was an unarmed biplane scout that performed well until the Allies began to arm their aircraft.

The Albatros B.III was the last of the company's unarmed two-seater scouts and was a precursor to the most important of their armed scouts, the C.III.

27 June 2012

No.692 (Fellowship of the Bellows) Squadron was part of the light night striking force of Bomber Command and was the first Mosquito squadron to use 4,000lb bombs operationally.

No.695 Squadron was an anti-aircraft co-operation squadron that was based in East Anglia from its formation in 1943 until being disbanded in 1949.

No.1435 Squadron was formed as a defensive fighter squadron on Malta, before becoming a fighter-bomber squadron operating over Italy and the Balkans.

22 June 2012

No.683 Squadron was a photographic reconnaissance that operated from Malta during 1943 before moving to Italy, where it spent the rest of the war.

No.684 Squadron was a photographic reconnaissance squadron that carried out long range missions over South-East Asia.

No.691 Squadron was an anti-aircraft co-operation squadron that served in the south-west of England from its formation late in 1943 until it was disbanded in 1949.

21 June 2012

The Albatros D.III was the most successful in the series of Albatros biplane fighters, and helped the Germans win control of the air over the Western Front in the first part of 1917.

The Albatros D.IV was an unsuccessful entry in the series of Albatros biplane fighters that dominated over the Western Front during 1917, and was doomed by the failure of its engine.

The Albatros D.V was produced in an attempt to improve on the successful D.III but suffered from structural failures that reduced its effectiveness. It was followed by the stronger D.IIIa, which played a major part in the fighting in the first part of 1918.

20 June 2012

No.680 Squadron was a photographic reconnaissance squadron that served in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Balkans from its formation in 1943 until early in 1945 when it was withdrawn to Egypt for mapping duties.

No.681 Squadron was a photographic reconnaissance squadron operating in the Far East that mainly focused on Burma but that also ranged further afield.

No.682 Squadron was a photographic reconnaissance unit that operated in the western and central Mediterranean during 1943 before moving to Italy where it remained for the rest of the war.

18 June 2012

The Albatros D.I was the first in a series of biplane fighters that helped the Germans gain control of the air over the Western Front early in 1917, but it was only produced in small numbers and was soon replaced by the Albatros D.II and Albatros D.III.

The Albatros D.II was the first version of the Albatros biplane fighter to be produced in significant numbers, and alongside the later D.III helped the Germans to gain air supremacy early in 1917.

14 June 2012

No.671 Squadron was an airborne operations squadron formed in South East Asia late in 1944 but that was never used in combat.

No.672 Squadron was an airborne operations squadron formed in South East Asia late in 1944 but that was never used in combat.

No.673 Squadron was an airborne operations squadron formed in South East Asia late in 1944 but that was never used in combat.

No.679 Squadron was an anti-aircraft co-operation squadron that served in East Anglia from 1943 until 1945.

11 June 2012

No.667 Squadron performed target towing and gun-laying duties from Gosport. The squadron was formed on 1 December 1943 from Nos.1631 and 1662 Flights, and was initially equipped with the Boulton-Paul Defiant.

No.668 Squadron was an airborne operations squadron formed in South East Asia late in 1944 but that was never used in combat.

No.669 Squadron was an airborne operations squadron formed in South East Asia late in 1944 but that was never used in combat.

No.670 Squadron was an airborne operations squadron formed in South East Asia late in 1944 but that was never used in combat.

31 May 2012

No.661 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that served in north-western Europe from August 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

No.662 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that served in north-western Europe from June 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

No.663 Squadron was a Polish-manned Air Observation Post that supported the Polish Army Corps during the last phase of the war in Italy.

No.664 Squadron was a Canadian manned Air Observation Post squadron that supported the First Canadian Army during the last few weeks of the fighting in north-western Europe in 1945.

No.665 Squadron was a Canadian manned Air Observation Post squadron that supported the First Canadian Army during the last few weeks of the fighting in north-western Europe in 1945.

No.666 Squadron was a third Canadian-manned Air Observation Post squadron but it was formed too late to see action and didn't reach the continent until after the German surrender.

15 May 2012

No.656 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that served on the Burma Front.

No.657 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that served in Italy from August 1943 until the spring 1945 before being transferred to the Netherlands for the last few weeks of the war in Europe.

No.658 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that served in Normandy and northern Europe before moving to India after the end of the war.

No.659 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that landing in Normandy soon after D-Day and that supported the Allied armies until the end of the war in Europe.

No.660 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that supported the Second Army in north-western Europe from July 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

11 May 2012

No.651 Squadron was the first of fifteen Air Observation Post squadrons formed to provide light aircraft for artillery officers who would observe and correct the accuracy of their own guns.

No.652 Squadron was an Air Observation Post that landed in Normandy on the day after D-Day and supported the Second Army in Europe for the rest of the war.

No.653 Squadron was an Air Observation Post that landed in Normandy towards the end of June 1944 and that supported army in Europe for the rest of the war.

No.654 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that supported the First Army in North Africa and the Eighth Army in Sicily and Italy.

No.655 Squadron was an Air Observation Post squadron that served in Italy from the summer of 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

4 May 2012

No.628 Squadron was formed as a special duties squadron but spent most of its brief existence flying a mix of meteorological flights and air-sea rescue missions in the Bay of Bengal and the Indian Ocean.

No.630 Squadron was part of Bomber Command and took part in the strategic bombing campaign from its formation late in 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

No.631 Squadron was a target-towing and gun laying training squadron that was based in Wales from its formation 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

No.635 Squadron was formed as part of the pathfinder force of Bomber Command and carried out that role from its formation in March 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

No.639 Squadron was an anti-aircraft co-operation squadron that served in Cornwall from its formation in December 1943 until being disbanded in April 1945.

No.650 Squadron was a target-towing and gun-laying practice squadron that served on the eastern side of the Irish Sea from its formation in December until the end of the Second World War.

1 May 2012

No.623 Squadron was a short-lived heavy bomber squadron that took part in Bomber Command's strategic bombing offensive for three months.

No.625 Squadron was part of Bomber Command's main force from its formation in October 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

No.626 Squadron was a heavy bomber squadron that formed part of Bomber Command's main force from its formation in November 1943 until the end of the war.

No.627 Squadron was formed on 12 November 1943 as a Mosquito squadron within No.8 Group, where it served with the Night Light Striking Force.

24 April 2012

No.620 Squadron was formed in 1943 as a heavy bomber squadron, but after 61 missions became a transport and airborne forces squadron, flying a mix of glider towing, paratrooper and air supply missions.

No.621 Squadron was a general reconnaissance squadron that spend 1943-45 engaged in anti-submarine warfare and general maritime patrols in the seas off East Africa and in the Red Sea.

No.622 Squadron was a heavy bomber squadron that formed part of Bomber Command's main force from the summer of 1943 until the end of 1945.

13 April 2012

No.617 Squadron is undoubtedly the most famous RAF squadron of the Second World War, earning that fame on its very first operational sortie, the famous dams raid of 16/17 May 1943. The 'dambusters' went on to become a highly accurate precision bombing squadron, reserved for special targets – either small scale, difficult to hit or that required the use of Barnes Wallis's other special bombs of the Second World War, the Tallboy and Grand Slam.

No.618 Squadron was formed to use a scaled down version of Barnes Wallis' 'bouncing bomb' as an anti-shipping weapon, but despite a great deal of effort and a transfer to the Far East the squadron never carried out an attack with its new weapon.

No.619 Squadron was a heavy bomber squadron that formed part of Bomber Command's main force from 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

6 April 2012

No.613 (City of Manchester) Squadron had a very varied wartime career, beginning as an army cooperation squadron and flying coastal patrols, air-sea rescue missions, tactical reconnaissance and fighter-bomber missions before ending the war as a night intruder squadron.

No.615 (County of Surrey) Squadron was a fighter squadron that took part in the Battle of Britain and the early sweeps over France before moving to Burma, where it performed a mix of offensive and defensive duties for the rest of the war.

No.616 (South Yorkshire) Squadron was a fighter squadron that became the first operational squadron to use a jet aircraft when it was equipped with the Gloster Meteor during 1944.

4 April 2012

No.610 (County of Chester) Squadron was a fighter squadron that took part in the Battle of Britain, before taking part in fighter sweeps,  shipping reconnaissance duties and the anti flying-bomb campaign

No.611 (West Lancashire) Squadron was a fighter squadron that flew a mix of offensive and defensive missions, ending the war as an escort squadron.

No.612 (County of Aberdeen) Squadron served with Coastal Command throughout the Second World War, spending most of the war operating from the UK but for the first half of 1942 it was based on Iceland.

2 April 2012

No.607 (County of Durham) Squadron was a fighter squadron that took part in the fighting in France in May 1940 and the Battle of Britain before moving to the Far East where it operated over Burma from 1942 until the end of the war.

No.608 (North Riding) Squadron went through two incarnations during the Second World War, the first with Coastal Command and the second as the only Auxiliary Air Force squadron to join Bomber Command.

No.609 (West Riding) Squadron began the Second World War as a fighter squadron, taking part in the Battle of Britain, before moving onto intruder operations, eventually joining Second Tactical Air Force.

30 March 2012

No.603 (City of Edinburgh) Squadron was a fighter squadron responsible for the first German aircraft to be shot down over Britain during the Second World War. It then went on to fight in the Battle of Britain and the offensive sweeps over France before moving to the Middle East where flew a mix of convoy protection, escort missions and anti-shipping strikes. Finally it returned to the UK to serve as a fighter-bomber squadron for the last months of the war in Europe.

No.604 (County of Middlesex) Squadron spent most of the Second World War as a night fighter squadron, flying a mix of defensive and offensive duties.

No.605 (County of Warwick) Squadron went through two incarnations during the Second World War, first as a fighter squadron that took part in the Battle of Britain before being destroyed during the early part of the war in the Pacific in 1942 and second as a home-based intruder squadron.

28 March 2012

No.600 'City of London' Squadron was an Auxiliary Air Force squadron that spent most of the Second World War serving as a night fighter unit, first from the UK and later in the Mediterranean.

No.601 'County of London' Squadron was a fighter squadron that took part in the fighting in France in 1940, the Battle of Britain, then moved to the Mediterranean, where it fought in North Africa, Sicily and Italy.

No.602 'City of Glasgow' Squadron was a fighter squadron that took part in the Battle of Britain before going on the offensive with 2nd Tactical Air Force. It was later withdrawn to the UK to counter the V-2 rocket.

21 March 2012

No.582 Squadron was a Lancaster-equipped Pathfinder squadron that served with Bomber Command's main force from April 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

No.587 Squadron was an anti-aircraft co-operation unit that served in the south-west of England and southern Wales from late in 1943 until the end of the war.

No.595 Squadron was an anti-aircraft co-operation squadron that operated in Wales from its formation late in 1943 until early in 1949.

No.597 Squadron was formed as a transport squadron on 10 January 1944, but no aircraft were received, and the new squadron was disbanded on 1 March 1944.

No.598 Squadron was an anti-aircraft co-operation squadron that served in the north of Scotland from the end of 1943 until the spring of 1945.

13 March 2012

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.250 was an advanced trainer designed for observers. It was similar in appearance to the M.S.230 intermediate trainer, with a swept-back parasol wing, but that had a new tail.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.251 was a more developed version of the M.S.250 advanced observer trainer.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.330 was a parasol wing trainer designed to replace the M.S.230 in French service, but that failed to live up to expectations and didn't enter production.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.331 was the designation given to a version of the unsuccessful M.S.330 trainer with a different engine

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.332 was the designation given to a version of the unsuccessful M.S.330 trainer given a Hispano-Suiza 9Qa radial engine

12 March 2012

No.575 Squadron was an airborne forces squadron that took part in the D-Day landings, the battle of Arnhem and the crossing of the Rhine.

No.576 Squadron was a Lancaster bomber squadron that served with No.1 Group from its formation late in 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

No.577 Squadron was an anti-aircraft co-operation squadron that worked with the army and navy from its formation in December 1943 until being disbanded in June 1946.

8 March 2012

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.233 was a version of the M.S.230 parasol wing intermediate trainer produced under licence in Portugal.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.234 was the designation given to three civil versions of the M.S.230 parasol wing trainer.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.235 was a version of the M.S.230 parasol wing intermediate trainer that was powered by a 300hp Gnome-Rhône 7Kb engine

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.236 was a version of the M.S.230 parasol wing intermediate trainer produced under licence by SABCA in Belgium.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.237 was the designation given to five aircraft based on the M.S.230 intermediate parasol wing trainer that were sold into private hands.

2 March 2012

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.229 was a version of the M.S.230 two-seat intermediate trainer that was produced for Switzerland during 1931.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.230 was the most important French intermediate training aircraft of the interwar period, and was a two-seat swept-back parasol wing trainer.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.231 was the designation given to six M.S.230 intermediate trainers that were powered by 240hp Lorraine 7Mb engines

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.232 was an experimental version of the M.S.230 intermediate trainer that was powered by a 200hp Clerget 9Ca diesel engine

27 February 2012

No.550 Squadron was a Lancaster squadron that formed part of Bomber Command's main force from his formation in November 1943 until the end of the war.

No.567 Squadron was an anti-aircraft co-operation squadron that served in the south-east of England from its formation late in 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

No.569 Squadron was a transport squadron that was never completely activated.

No.570 Squadron was an airborne forces squadron that took part in every major airborne operation from D-Day to the crossing of the Rhine, supported SOE operations in Europe and also served as a tactical bomber squadron during 1945.

No.571 Squadron was a mosquito bomber squadron that formed part of the Light Night Striking Force from its formation in April 1944 until the end of the Second World War.

24 February 2012

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.147 was a trainer produced by matching the faired fuselage and landing gear of the M.S.130 and the swept back parasol wing of the M.S.138.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.148 was the designation given to one M.S.147 swept parasol wing trainer that was powered by a 95hp Salmson 7Ac engine

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.149 was a parasol wing basic trainer that was used by the French Navy during the first half of the 1930s.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.200 was a parasol wing intermediate trainer produced in 1929 and tested but not adopted by the French navy.

21 February 2012

No.544 Squadron was a photographic reconnaissance squadron that was split between bases in the UK at on Gibraltar when first formed, before concentrating in the UK in October 1943.

No.547 Squadron was an anti-shipping and anti-submarine warfare squadron that largely operated over the Bay of Biscay from late 1942 until the autumn of 1944, and then off the coast of Norway from then until the end of the war.

No.548 Squadron was a fighter squadron created to defend northern Australia against any Japanese air raids from the north.

No.549 Squadron was a Spitfire squadron formed to provide fighter cover in northern Australia, an area that remained within range of Japanese aircraft until surprisingly late in the Second World War.

17 February 2012

No.540 Squadron was a long range reconnaissance unit that was formed from part of the Photographic Reconnaissance Unit, and that provided cover over most of occupied Europe.

No.541 Squadron was a photographic reconnaissance unit that was formed from part of the Photographic Reconnaissance Unit in 1942, and spent the rest of the war based at Benson and operating over occupied Europe.

No.542 Squadron was a photographic reconnaissance unit that operated the Spitfire over northern Europe from its formation in 1942 until the end of the war.

No.543 Squadron was a short-lived photographic reconnaissance unit that was disbanded in October 1943, one day short of a year after being formed.

15 February 2012

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.137 was a version of the parasol wing M.S.138 trainer that was powered by a 120hp Salmson 9Ac radial engine

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.138 was a two-seat parasol primary trainer, used by the French Air Force in the first half of the 1930s.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.139 was a version of the M.S.138 parasol wing two-seat primary trainer that was powered by a Clerget engine

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.191 was a version of the M.S.138 two-seat primary trainer that had a slightly reduced wingspan.

8 February 2012

No.530 Squadron was one of ten Turbinlite squadrons formed in September 1942, just before the entire programme was abandoned.

No.531 Squadron was one of ten Turbinlite squadrons formed on 2 September 1942 to operate a mix of searchlight-equipped Havocs and Hurricane fighters.

No.532 Squadron was one of ten Turbinlite squadrons formed on 2 September 1942 to operate a mix of searchlight-equipped Havocs and Hurricane fighters.

No.533 Squadron was one of ten Turbinlite squadrons formed on 2 September 1942 to operate a mix of searchlight-equipped Havocs and Hurricane fighters.

No.534 Squadron was one of ten Turbinlite squadrons formed on 2 September 1942 to operate a mix of searchlight-equipped Havocs and Hurricane fighters.

No.535 Squadron was one of ten Turbinlite squadrons formed on 2 September 1942 to operate a mix of searchlight-equipped Havocs and Hurricane fighters.

No.536 Squadron was one of ten Turbinlite squadrons formed on 2 September 1942 to operate a mix of searchlight-equipped Havocs and Hurricane fighters.

No.537 Squadron was one of ten Turbinlite squadrons formed on 2 September 1942 to operate a mix of searchlight-equipped Havocs and Hurricane fighters.

No.538 Squadron was one of ten Turbinlite squadrons formed on 2 September 1942 to operate a mix of searchlight-equipped Havocs and Hurricane fighters.

No.539 Squadron was one of ten Turbinlite squadrons formed on 2 September 1942 to operate a mix of searchlight-equipped Havocs and Hurricane fighters.

3 February 2012

No.526 Squadron was a radar calibration squadron that served in northern Scotland.

No.527 Squadron was a radar calibration squadron formed to serve in the south of England and East Anglia, but whose area of operations eventually extended up to the north of Scotland.

No.528 Squadron was a radar calibration squadron that was formed in the south-west, before moving to Lincolnshire.

No.529 Squadron was a radar calibration squadron that was formed in Cheshire, but later moved to Henley-on-Thames, where it would become the first RAF squadron to use a helicopter operationally.

2 February 2012

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.130 was a parasol wing trainer that saw most use with the French navy.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.131 was the designation given to a single M.S.130 parasol wing trainer that was fitted with a 230hp Lorraine engine

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.132 was the designation given to a single M.S.130 parasol wing trainer that was converted to use a 120hp Salmson 7Ab radial engine

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.133 was the designation given to four existing parasol wing trainers that were converted to use the 270hp Gnome-Rhone 5Kc radial.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.134 was the designation given to a version of the M.S.130 swept parasol wing trainer that was powered by an 80hp Clerget 9B rotary engine

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.136 was the designation given to a version of the M.S.130 swept parasol wing trainer that was powered by an 120hp Salmson 9Ac radial engine

10 January 2012

No.512 Squadron was a transport squadron formed in 1943 and that spent the first half of 1944 working with the airborne forces, and took part in the D-Day landings.

No.513 Squadron was a heavy bomber squadron that was formed and disbanded during 1943, never becoming operational.

No.514 Squadron was a Lancaster bomber squadron that formed part of Bomber Command from its formation late in 1943 until the end of the Second World War.

No.515 Squadron began its existence as an experimental electronic counter-measures squadron, before joining No.100 Group and ending the war as a Mosquito intruder squadron.

9 January 2012

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.50 was a parasol-wing primary trainer produced in 1924, and that differed from the earlier M.S.35 in having an improved wing.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.51 was a version of the M.S.50 parasol wing primary trainer, but with an inline engine in place of the original aircraft's radial engine.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.53 was a parasol wing trainer that was produced in small numbers and sold to the Turkish Air Force.

The Morane-Saulnier M.S.129 was developed from the M.S.53 parasol wing trainer, and differed mainly in having a more powerful engine.

5 January 2012

No.501 ‘County of Gloucester’ Squadron was a fighter squadron that was originally formed as part of the Special Reserve in 1929, and that took part in the Battle of Britain, the period of offensive sweeps over occupied Europe and the anti V-1 campaign.

No.504 ‘County of Nottingham’ Squadron was formed as a Special Reserve bomber squadron in 1928, but spent the entire Second World War serving as a fighter squadron, ending the war as one of the first Meteor jet squadrons.

No.510 Squadron was a home-based transport squadron that provided communications flights in Britain from 1942 until the spring of 1944.

4 January 2012

No.357 Squadron was a Special Duties squadron used to support guerrilla fighters and Allied agents operating behind Japanese lines in Burma, Malaya and Sumatra.

No.358 Squadron was a special duties squadron that served in the Far East from early in 1945.

No.500 ‘County of Kent’ Squadron was a pre-war Special Reserve unit that served with Coastal Command for most of the Second World War before being reformed as a bomber squadron in 1944.

3 January 2012

No.354 Squadron was an anti-submarine and anti-shipping squadron that served in the Far East from its formation in 1943 until it was disbanded in May 1945.

No.355 Squadron was a heavy bomber squadron that operated over South-East Asia.

No.356 Squadron was a heavy bomber squadron that operated over South East Asia and that took part in the last bombing raid of the Second World War.

2 January 2012

No.351 Squadron was a Yugoslav-manned fighter squadron that carried out ground attack missions in support of the Yugoslavian partisans.

No.352 Squadron was the first Yugoslav-manned fighter squadron formed in the Mediterranean and was used for fighter escort and ground attack missions over Yugoslavia.

No.353 Squadron was formed in India in 1942 as a reconnaissance squadron, but spent most of the war serving as a transport unit

Updates from: 20142013201220112010200920082007



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