WAR IN THE AIR : Updates 2016

Updates from: 201820172016201520142013201220112010200920082007

27 December 2016

The Boulton Paul P.92 was a design for a turret fighter armed with 20mm cannon, produced in response to a rather ambitious Air Ministry Specification.

The Boulton Paul P.94 was a version of the Defiant turret fighter, modified to be a conventional single seater armed with fixed forward firing machine guns or cannon.

15 December 2016

The Boulton Paul P.90 was a heavy bomber designed to the same specification as the Short Stirling.

The Boulton Paul P.91 was a design for a heavy bomber that was produced to the specification that eventually produced the Handley Page Halifax and Avro Manchester and Lancaster.

7 December 2016

The Boulton Paul P.88 was a design for a cannon armed fighter, designed in response to the increased speed of bomber aircraft in the mid 1930s.

The Boulton Paul P.89 was a design for a twin engined cannon armed fighter, designed in response to Air Ministry Specification F.37/35.

15 November 2016

The Boulton Paul P.80 Superstrand was a design for an improved version of the P.75 Overstrand, but it was already obsolete by the time it was suggested, and didn't enter production.

The Boulton Paul P.85 was a design for a naval version of the P.82 Defiant turret fighter, but was rejected in favour of the Blackburn R

7 November 2016

The Boulton Paul P.75 Overstrand was the first RAF aircraft to have an enclosed powered gun turret, and was developed from the earlier Boulton & Paul Sidestrand. It was also the last biplane bomber to enter service with the RAF.

The Boulton Paul P.79 was a design for a bomber that was produced to the same specification that resulted in the Armstrong Whitworth Whitley.

26 October 2016

The Boulton & Paul P.70 was a design for a bomber, based on the earlier P.64 mail carrier and P.69 bomber-transport design, and was the first Boulton & Paul design to be produced with power operated gun turrets from the start.

The Boulton Paul P.74 was the company's first design for a turret fighter, and was a twin engined design that would have carried two turrets.

21 October 2016

The 404th Fighter Group (USAAF) served with the Ninth Air Force and took part in the D-Day invasion, the advance across France, the battle of the Bulge, the crossing of the Rhine and the invasion of Germany.

The 405th Fighter Group (USSAF) served with the Ninth Air Force and took part in the D-Day landings, the advance across France, the battle of the Bulge, the crossing of the Rhine and the invasion of Germany.

The 406th Fighter Group (USAAF) served with the Ninth Air Force and took part in the D-Day landings, the break out from Normandy, the sieges of St Malo and Brest, the advance across France, the Battle of the Bulge and the advance into Germany.

6 October 2016

The Boulton & Paul P.67 was a design for a monoplane fighter produced to satisfy Air Ministry Specification F.7/30.

The Boulton & Paul P.69 was a design for a bomber/ transport aircraft, based on the earlier P.64 mail carrier

29 September 2016

The Boulton & Paul P.63 Streamline was a design for a high performance interceptor that came at the end of a family of similar designs.

The Boulton & Paul P.66 was a design for a general purpose aircraft, to replace the numerous Westland Wapati and Fairey Gordon biplanes.

13 September 2016

The Boulton & Paul P.37 Streamline was a design for a sesquiplane day bomber that was the first in a series of similar designs, none of which entered production.

The Boulton & Paul P.58 was the designation given to a series of designs for a fleet spotter, produced in response to Specification S.9/30.

2 September 2016

The 372nd Fighter Group was a home based training unit that served with the Fourth and Third Air Forces.

The 373rd Fighter Group served with the Ninth Air Force and took part in the D-Day invasion, the advance across France, the battle of the Bulge and the invasion of Germany.

The 402nd Fighter Group went through two incarnations during the Second World War, first as a medium bomber formation in China and then as a home based fighter training unit.

26 August 2016

The Boulton & Paul P.34 was a naval version of the P.33 Partridge single seat fighter, and like the land based version didn't enter production.

The Boulton & Paul P.35 was a design for a fighter with an upwards firing Coventry Ordnance Works 37mm cannon.

18 August 2016

The Boulton & Paul P.32 was a design for a heavy bomber that reached the prototype stage, but wasn't ordered into production.

The Boulton & Paul P.33 Partridge was a single seat biplane fighter designed to the same specification as the Bristol Bulldog.

8 August 2016

The Boulton & Paul P.29 Sidestrand was a twin engined bomber that was the company's first military aircraft to enter production.

The Boulton & Paul P.31 Bittern was an ambitious design for a monoplane night fighter that was let down by underpowered engines.

26 July 2016

The Boulton & Paul P.25 Bugle was a further development of the P.7 Bourges and all-metal P.15 Bolton twin engined bombers, and was produced in small numbers as part of the Air Ministries attempt to keep as many aircraft companies working as possible with limited funds.

The Boulton & Paul P.27 was a further development in the company's family of twin engined bombers, and although it didn’t get built itself, it did play a part in the development of the P.29 Sidestrand.

25 July 2016

The 369th Fighter Group was a home based training unit that was active for two years from August 1943.

The 370th Fighter Group served with the Ninth Air Force and took part in the D-Day landings, the advance across France, Operation Market Garden, the Battle of the Bulge and the invasion of Germany.

The 371st Fighter Group served with the Ninth Air Force and took part in the D-Day invasion, the advance across France, the battle of the Bulge and the invasion of Germany.

7 July 2016

The Boulton & Paul P.12 Bodmin was a large experimental multi-engined aircraft, produced to test out the possibility of mounting an aircraft's engines within the fuselage.

The Boulton & Paul P.15 Bolton was the first all-metal aircraft to be delivered to the RAF, and was largely based on the earlier Boulton & Paul P.7 Bourges fighter-bomber.

29 June 2016

The Boulton & Paul P.10 was the first practical all-metal aircraft to be produced in Britain.

The Boulton & Paul P.11/ Type XXI was a design for a two-seat amphibian aircraft, produced in response to RAF Specification XXI.

21 June 2016

The Boulton & Paul P.3 Bobolink was the company's first internally designed aircraft, and was produced in response to a competition to replace the Sopwith Camel.

The Boulton & Paul P.7 Bourges was a promising design for a fighter-bomber that was produced in 1918, and disappeared after the end of the First World War.

10 June 2016

The Boeing C-75 was the military designation given to five Model 307 Stratoliners that were commandeered by the USAAF in 1942.

The Watanabe K8W1 Experimental 12-Shi Primary Seaplane Trainer was designed to replace the Yokosuka K4Y1 Type 90 Seaplane Trainer, but lost out to a Kawanishi design.

27 May 2016

The Aichi H9A flying boat was the only dedicated flying boat trainer to be placed into production in significant numbers during the Second World War.

The Aichi S1A Denko (Bolt of Light) was a Japanese Navy night fighter that was at an advanced stage of development before US bombing destroyed the two prototypes, effectively ending the programme.

19 May 2016

The Aichi B7A Ryusei (Shooting Star) 'Grace' was a large torpedo bomber designed for use on a new generation of Japanese aircraft carriers, but that only saw limited service from land after the Japanese carrier fleet was destroyed.

The Aichi D1A Diver Bomber 'Susie' was a carrier dive-bomber based on the Heinkel He 66 that saw service with the Japanese Navy during the 1930s.

9 May 2016

The Douglas RD was the Navy version of the Douglas Dolphin twin-engined amphibious aircraft, and was produced in a number of variants for the Navy and Coast Guard.

The Douglas C-29 Dolphin was the most powerful aircraft in the Dolphin series and was powered by two 550hp engines.

4 May 2016

The 366th Fighter Group served with the Ninth Air Force and took part in the D-Day invasion, the advance across France, Operation Market Garden, the Battle of the Bulge and the invasion of Germany.

The 367th Fighter Group served with the Ninth Air Force and took part on the D-Day invasion, the advance across France, the Battle of the Bulge and the invasion of Germany.

The 368th Fighter Group served with the Ninth Air Force and took part in the D-Day invasion, the siege of Cherbourg, the advance across France, the attack on Germany and the Battle of the Bulge.

26 April 2016

The Ago C.VII was a modified version of the unsuccessful Ago C.IV reconnaissance aircraft, with a number of structural improvements.

The Ago C.VIII was a modified version of the unsuccessful Ago C.IV, but with a modified tail and a more powerful 260hp Mercedes D.IVa engine.

The Ago S.I was a single seat ground attack aircraft that was still under development at the end of the First World War.

15 April 2016

The Ago C.III was a smaller version of the Ago C.I twin boom pusher reconnaissance aircraft.

The Ago C.IV was an armed reconnaissance aircraft with unusual tapered wings that entered production in 1916 but that was unpopular with its crews and was only produced in small numbers.

6 April 2016

The Ago C.I was a twin-boomed pusher observation aircraft that was the first C-type aircraft to enter service, and that was a moderate success.

The Ago C.II was a development of the successful Ago C.I twin-boom pusher, and was produced in several different versions.

4 April 2016

The 362nd Fighter Group (USAAF) served with the Ninth Air Force, and took part in the D-Day invasion, the advance across France, the battle of the Bulge and the invasion of Germany.

The 363rd Fighter Group/ 363rd Tactical Reconnaissance Group (USAAF) served with the Ninth Air Force, changing role half way thorough the campaign in north-western Europe.

The 365th Fighter Group served with the Ninth Air Force, taking part in the D-Day campaign, the advance across France, Operation Market Garden, the battle of the Bulge and the invasion of Germany.

29 March 2016

The A.E.G. R.I was a 'Giant' class bomber produced during 1918, but that never entered production, and suffered the loss of the first prototype.

The A.E.G. PE was an armoured ground attack fighter that was the only aircraft of its type to be produced as a triplane.

17 March 2016

The A.E.G. G.IV was the most successful in a series of A.E.G. twin engined bombers and was used by the German air service from late in 1916 until the end of the First World War.

The A.E.G. G.V was a larger version of the A.E.G. G.IV twin engined bomber, but it appeared too late to see service in the First World War.

9 March 2016

The A.E.G. G.II was the first in the series of A.E.G. twin engine bombers to enter production, although only in small numbers.

The A.E.G. G.III was an improved version of the A.E.G. G.II, and was produced in small numbers before being replaced by the definitive A.E.G. G.IV.

8 March 2016

The 357th Fighter Group (USAAF) served with the Eighth Air Force, flying a mix of bomber escort and ground attack missions as well as supporting the D-Day landings, the break out from Normandy, the Battle of the Bulge and the crossing of the Rhine.

The 358th Fighter Group (USAAF) fought with the Eighth and then Ninth Air Forces, taking part in the D-Day invasion, and carrying out ground attack and fighter sweep missions as the Allies advanced across Europe.

The 360th Fighter Group (USAAF) was a home based training unit.

26 February 2016

The A.E.G. DJ.I was a single seat armoured ground attack biplane that was still under development at the end of the First World War.

The A.E.G. G.I was the first in the successful series of A.E.G twin engined bombers, but was underpowered itself and only a single example was produced.

18 February 2016

The A.E.G. D.I was the first single seat fighter to be produced by A.E.G., and wasn't a great success with a small production contract being cancelled after two prototypes had crashed.

The A.E.G. Dr.I was an unsuccessful design for a triplane, based on the equally unsuccessful A.E.G. D.I.

17 February 2016

The 353rd Fighter Group (USAAF) served with the Eighth Air Force, providing bomber escorts, flying ground attack missions and protecting troop transports.

The 354th Fighter Group (USAAF) served with the Ninth Air Force from 1943 to the end of the Second World War, taking part in the D-Day campaign, the campaign in north-west Europe, Operation Market Garden and the Battle of the Bulge.

The 355th Fighter Group (USAAF) operated with the Eighth Air Force, flying bomber escort, fighter sweeps and ground attack missions.

8 February 2016

The A.E.G. C.VII was an experimental entry in the A.E.G. C series and was produced with two different wing configurations.

The A.E.G. C.VIII was an experimental entry in the A.E.G. C series and was produced with two different wing configurations, one biplane and one triplane.

27 January 2016

The A.E.G. C.IV was the most numerous entry in the A.E.G. C series, and introduced a fixed forward firing machine gun and a more powerful engine.

The A.E.G. C.V was an experimental version of the C.IV that given a more powerful Mercedes engine.

18 January 2016

The A.E.G. C.II was a more manoeuvrable version of the A.E.G. C.I, with smaller dimensions and a lighter weight than the C.I.

The A.E.G. C.III was an experimental aircraft, in which the fuselage filled the entire gap between the two wings.

13 January 2016

The 347th Fighter Group (USAAF) fought on Guadalcanal, the Solomons, New Guinea, Borneo, the Dutch East Indies and the Philippines.

The 348th Fighter Group (USAAF) was based in the south-west Pacific and fought on New Guinea, in the Dutch East Indies, the Philippines before ending the war operating against the Japanese Home Islands.

The 350th Fighter Group (USAAF) was formed in Britain as part of the Eighth Air Force, but quickly moved to North Africa and remained in the Mediterranean theatre for the rest of the war.

5 January 2016

The A.E.G. B.III was the last in a series of unarmed two-seat reconnaissance aircraft, and was an improved version of the B.II.

The A.E.G. C.I was the first in a series of armed reconnaissance aircraft, and was based on the unarmed A.E.G. B.II.

Updates from: 201820172016201520142013201220112010200920082007



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